ODG Guild Header
Established January 17 1881
 
Guild Home Page Guild Officers Diary of events in the Guild Branch details and contacts within the Guild Latest news and newsletters from the Guild and Branches Details of quarters and peals rung in the Guild The Guild Documentation Frequently Asked Questions Links to other ringing websites

Guild History Page
Search this website
St. Peter, Iver, Bucks
East Berks & South Bucks branch of the ODG
St. Peter, Iver
St. Peter, Iver İBM 31 May 2004
Dedication: St. Peter, Iver

Service Ringing: Sun 9.30am

Practice night: Tue 8.00pm

Availability and Restrictions

  • Visiting ringers: Generally OK
  • Quarter Peals: Occasionally — not daytime ( Offices near church )
  • Peals: No
The Bells (8) 17-2-14

Access to ringing chamber: Open spiral iron staircase — approx 40 steps.

The earliest record of the bells is from 1552 which gives Iver as havingFour great bells and a sacring or sanctus bell’ (A.H.Cocks) and there was also a leaded steeple.

Part of the old bell frame, dated 1621, is now to be found in the lych gate.

By 1637 there were five large bells and a Sanctus. The five bells were recast in 1747 by Robert Catlin of Holborn to form a ring of six and of these, the present tenor bell ( 17 cwt ) is the only survivor intact. The inscription on the tenor bell is: ‘ John Elton and Joseph Thackthet Ch Wardens, Rt Catlin fecit 1747. The Rev Mr John Brett Saunders Vicar.’ In 1762 the 2nd bell broke and was recast by Lester and Pack of Whitechapel. In 1769 the 4th bell broke and was replaced by a new bell weighing 10cwt 3 qtrs and 19lb. Mears preserved a rubbing of the original inscription on the bell which read ‘T. Lester of London made me’. In 1770/1 the 3rd bell ( present 5th ) broke and was replaced with a new bell 10 cwt 0 qtrs 24lbs. The inscription is ‘ Jno Thatckthwaite and S Bowry Ch wardens Pack and Chapman of London fecit 1770’. The treble ( present 3 ) was also recast in 1787. The inscription on the bell recorded prior to recasting in 1929 read : ‘Robert Patrick of London Founder 1787. Richard Abrook and George Binfield Ch wardens.’

In 1885 two more of the six, numbers 4 & 5 ( present 6 & 7 ) were recast by Mears and Stainbank of Whitechapel and all the bells rehung. An iron spiral staircase up to the belfry was added in 1895. In that year an Ellacombe chiming apparatus was added which became inoperable in 1929 on augmentation of the bells to 8 and rehanging.

In 1929 the former treble bell ( now no 3 ) was recast by Gillett and Johnston and two new trebles added inscribed ‘The Gift of a Parishioner’. Until then the rope-circle had fallen anti-clockwise. It is now in the more usual clockwise fashion.

A new steel frame was installed in 1937 and the bells were rehung on ball bearings.

A ring of 8; tenor 17-2-14, diameter 46½”, tuned to E
Bell Weight
cwt-qr-lb
Diameter Strike
note
Date
cast
Founder Foundry
location
Inscription
treble 5-1-0 28½ E 1929 Gillett & Johnston Croydon THE GIFT OF A PARISHIONER 1929 GILLETT & JOHNSTON CROYDON
2 5-2-14 29½ D# 1929 Gillett & Johnston Croydon THE GIFT OF A PARISHIONER 1929 GILLETT & JOHNSTON CROYDON
3 6-0-4 31 C# 1929 Gillett & Johnston Croydon RECAST 1929
FW COBB MA VICAR
GEORGINA WARD
EDWARD B REED CHURCHWARDENS
RECAST 1929 BY GILLETT & JOHNSTON CROYDON
4 7-1-24 34¼ B 1768 Lester & Pack Whitechapel [E11] GLORY TO GOD ON HIGH [E11] OUR VOICES SHALL WITH JOYFUL SOUNDMAKE HILLS AND VALLEYS [E11] ECHO ROUND
LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1768
(incised) S„ BATTING & G„ BINFIELD CH„WARDENS I„ SPENCER CLARK
5 9-3-16 37¾ A 1770 Pack & Chapman Whitechapel PACK & CHAPMAN OF LONDON FECIT 1770 [Border G11]
(incised) JNO THACKTHWAITE & S„ BOWRY CH „WARDENS„
6 10-0-2 38 G# 1885 Mears & Stainbank Whitechapel MEARS & STAINBANK, FOUNDERS, LONDON 1885.
7 12-2-9 41½ F# 1885 Mears & Stainbank Whitechapel MEARS & STAINBANK, FOUNDERS, LONDON 1885.
tenor 17-2-14 46½ E 1747 Robert Catlin Holborn [Bell]THE REV: MRIOHN BRETT SAUNDERS VICAR
IOHN ELTON IOSEPH THACKTHET CHURCH WARDENS ·:· RT CATLIN FECIT J747
Sanctus 2-0-0# 20½   1792 Thomas Mears Whitechapel 1792

Notes:

  1. An interesting and comprehensive guide to Bells and Bellringing at St Peter’s Church, Iver is produced by David and Stella Rowlands in aid of St. Peter‘s Church Bell Fund at £4.00 and is a very good read!
Architecture:

The church is remarkable in having surviving work from all the periods of English architecture from the Saxon to the Perpendicular. The national association of the church includes four generations of the royal family in the recent past and, before them, eminent politicians, sailors, courtiers and businessmen.

The first mention of Iver was in the Chronicle of Aethelward in 893 and by the time the Domesday Book was compiled in 1086, Iver was a large prosperous village with a probable population of more than 200.

The font is Norman, hewn from a block of Purbeck marble.

The second of two Norman arches in the Nave cuts through a blocked up pre-existing window, probably Saxon and late C 11th.

The nave walls were raised in the C 15th and clerestory windows inserted in the Perpendicular style. The modern painted shields (1913) on the stone corbels supporting the roof timbers recall the various ecclesiastical jurisdictions past and present to which the parish had been subject in the course of its history.

The pulpit dates from 1717 was originally a triple-decker, with the clerk‘s desk at the bottom, the priest‘s stall above and then steps up to the pulpit itself.

In the Sanctuary is the Communion Table, made by John Weatherall between 1774 and 1794. Note also the beautifully arcaded recess containing the sedilia and the double piscina.

In the South aisle there is yet another piscina and stairs to the Rood loft can be seen. Against the west wall are the old fire hooks formerly used to pull down burning cottages or thatch.

There are numerous Brasses and Wall monuments.

At the West door there is a representation of the pagan Green man with an oak leaf over his mouth. Near to the ground on the wall there is an Ordnance survey bench mark. The outline of an earlier round arched door may be seen in the tower wall. The small Priest’s door leading into the Chancel on the South side has two heads representing temporal and spiritual power (state and church).

Collated by Gill Skinner from various sources.

The Clock:

The clock is by John Moore of Clerkenwell; installed Dec 1848. It strikes the hours only. One clock hammer on the treble to be pulled off before ringing.

Church facilities: Toilet in church

Travel Details: OS Grid Ref: Q040811

Eating Places: 3 pubs, 2 cafes in village

Return to the EBSB Branch listings page

Valid CSS!  Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional     © Oxford Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers 2009 - Site Map